Glossary - Ship Structure

Ship Terms - Structure  

aboard --- objects on a ship are aboard
aft --- lengthwise that which is towards the rear of the ship
ahead --- objects in front of a ship are ahead, while an object to the rear of a ship is astern
aloft, as in to go aloft --- if you climb a stack or rigging above the structure of a ship you go aloft
amidships --- the midpoint area of a ship
astern --- objects in front of a ship are ahead, while an object to the rear of a ship is astern. Astern steam refers to moving the ship in reverse.
beam --- the extreme width of the ship, usually in the midship area
board --- to go on board
bow --- the front of the ship
bridge --- the control area of a ship
bulkhead --- a vertical wall, usually a structural element, that divides the interior of a ship into compartments. Bulkheads most commonly run transversely (across a ship) but may also be longitudinal.
centerline --- a ship is divided lengthwise by the centerline
compartments --- the rooms or working spaces of a ship
cutwater --- the forward end of the keel which turns upward is the stem, and the part of the stem that rises above water is the prow and the forward most edge of the stem is the cutwater
damage control --- the control area on a ship with fire sensing monitors and remote control over damage control systems - such as remotely activating the watertight doors and fire doors. On the Big U, just aft of the wheel house, port side.
decks --- the floors of a ship are called decks - these layers support structure elements (compartments) and equipment. Decks also provide strength for the ship hull.
double bottom --- In the U, a double bottom design is created by construction of tanks (and voids) at the bottom and sides of the ship which greatly strengthens the ship and affords protection against hull penetration. Should the hull be struck by an object where there is a double bottom, the liquid in the tank would escape outward (exchange with sea water), but providing the inner wall is not breached, no flooding inside the ship will occur.
draft --- the vertical measurement from the bottom of the ship to the waterline. In other words, how deep a ship extends into the water.
fore --- lengthwise the forward area on a ship
forecastle deck --- The forward most deck area near the bow on the Promenade Deck. On Big U plans - noted as Crews Open Promenade. (forecastle is pronounced folk’ sel)
freeboard --- the vertical distance from ship’s waterline upward to the main deck
galley --- where cooking is done in a ship
go below --- descending
hull --- the main body of a ship or vessel. The plates are the outer most structural elements of the hull while inside the hull strengthening elements such as decks, bulkheads and stanchions define compartments and spaces.
inboard --- placement or movement toward the centerline
inner bottom --- the deck level above the outer bottom tanks. In the U, a double bottom design is created by construction of tanks (and voids) which greatly strengthens the bottom of the ship and affords protection against hull penetration.
keel --- the bottom most structural element of a ship from which all structural elements are built up to create the hull. This backbone of the ship is a flat bottom keel on the Big U (as it does not extend below the bottom of the ship).
list --- a leaning of the ship to one side or the other
mast --- a vertical element extending above an open deck, as in the radar mast
on board --- two words used rather than aboard, referring to human beings
outboard --- placement or movement away from centerline of the ship
port --- port refers to the left side of the ship. Objects aboard ship that are left of the centerline are to port, the port side of the ship is the left side
port gangway --- a gangway on the port side of a ship
prow --- the forward end of the keel which turns upward is the stem and the part of the stem that rises above water is the prow and the forward most edge of the stem is the cutwater
stacks --- term used rather than funnel - the stacks are designed to lift gases, soot or ashes up away from the ship. On the U, the stacks also are large to make the ship visible to other vessels - for collision avoidance.
starboard --- when facing forward along the centerline of the ship everything to your right is starboard, the right side of the ship
stem --- the forward end of the keel which turns upward is the stem (construction) and the part of the stem that rises above water is the prow and the forward most edge of the stem is the cutwater
stern --- the rearmost part of the ship
strakes --- the steel plates that form the ship’s hull are called strakes. There are both welded and riveted strakes in the construction of the Big U.
strength deck --- On the SSUS this is the Main Deck. On ships, the complete deck (bow to stern, side to side) designed for maximum load bearing and hull stresses.
superstructure --- the structure of the SSUS above and including the Promenade Deck. Superstructure generally refers to the structure levels or decks above the main plated hull enclosed decks.
topside --- to go up in a ship
trim --- the pitch (fore to aft inclination) of a vessel (or plane)
waterline --- the level of water along the outside hull of a ship in water. The waterline changes depending on the load of the ship.
watertight bulkhead --- the interior division bulkhead (wall) that extends vertically from the keel up to the main deck, and extends side to side to provide extra strength for the hull for the purpose of creating independent watertight sections of the ship.

Speaking of watertight - there are 66 watertight doors on the Big U. Each or all could be remotely activated - opened or closed from Damage Control. Next week we'll add more Big U specific terms.

Ship Terms - Big U Arrangements  Coming next week.

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